Young women

The workforce participation rate of young women (15‑24 years) is slightly lower compared to young men (66.4 per cent and 67.4 per cent respectively).

 


Source: ABS, Labour Force, Australia, Feb 2017, cat. no. 6202.0, 12 month average of seasonally adjusted data, persons 15-24 years.

The workforce participation rates for young women (15-24) are 66.4%, compared with all women (15+) at 59.2%, and young men (15-24) at 67.4%.

The Government continues to ensure its mainstream employment services feature a range of interventions, activities and complementary programs to help young job seekers, including young women.

In particular, young women are benefiting from the Government’s $855 million Youth Employment Package. At the core of the package is Youth Jobs PaTH (Prepare, Trial, Hire). The package also includes an expansion of the New Enterprise Incentive Scheme and other measures to encourage entrepreneurship and self-employment among job seekers, including among young women. 

The package builds on earlier measures to assist young people into employment. A key Government initiative is the Transition to Work service, which provides intensive pre-employment assistance to young people who have disengaged from work and study and are at risk of long‑term welfare dependence. In addition, Empowering YOUth Initiatives support new, innovative approaches from not-for-profit and non-government organisations to help young people overcome the barriers they face and move into work.

Where are we?

The Government will invest $855 million over four years in a Youth Employment Package which will assist up to 120,000 young people to take advantage of job opportunities as the economy diversifies and transitions to broader‑based growth. This package includes an expansion of  the New Enterprise Incentive Scheme and other measures to encourage entrepreneurship and self-employment among job seekers, including young women.

The Youth Jobs PaTH (Prepare, Trial, Hire) program is the core element of the Youth Employment Package. The program is a three stage pathway to work to help give young people the employability skills that employers want, opportunities for work experience and the support to move from welfare to work.

One key initiative is the Transition to Work service that provides intensive pre-employment assistance to young people who have disengaged from work and study and are at risk of long-term welfare dependence. In addition, Empowering YOUth Initiatives support new innovative approaches from not-for-profit and non-government organisations to help young people overcome the barriers they face and move into work.

The Government is also investing $96 million in the Try, Test and Learn Fund to trial new and innovative approaches to assist people with the capacity to work into stable and sustainable employment. Two of the initial priority groups for the Try, Test and Learn Fund are young parents and young carers. Both of these groups have a high proportion of young women.

Key Actions 2017-18

  • Continue to roll out Youth Jobs PaTH (Prepare-Trial-Hire) from April 2017, a $762.6 million initiative to help maximise the chances of job seekers under 25 getting a job. The program will involve three flexible stages:
    • Employability skills training to help prepare young job seekers for the workplace. The training will help young people better understand what employers expect of them and give them the skills, attitudes and behaviours required to be successful in a job.
    • From 1 April 2017, up to 30,000 young job seekers each year will be able to undertake an internship placement of 4 to 12 weeks. The internships are voluntary and provide incentives of $1,000 upfront to a business to host an intern and a $200 fortnightly payment to job seekers on top of their income support.
    • From 1 January 2017 a Youth Bonus wage subsidy of between $6,500 and $10,000 (GST inclusive) is available to businesses who take on an eligible young job seeker. As part of this measure, existing wage subsidies (including those for young people, parents, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, mature age workers, and the long‑term unemployed) have been streamlined, making them easier for employers to access.
  • Implement the Try Test and Learn Fund ($96 million) to test innovative policy approaches that create a path out of the welfare system. 
  • Examine the outcomes of the initiatives under the over $330 million Youth Employment Strategy and the $840.3 million Youth Employment Package to monitor their impact on women.
  • Fund through the new Launch into Work program, pre-employment projects that provide training, mentoring and work experience to assist job seekers to become work ready. Projects are flexible and may be designed to meet the specific needs of young women.
  • Invest $263 million to expand the ParentsNext program nationally from 1 July 2018. Each year this expansion will assist parents of young children, who may be at risk of long-term welfare dependency. While most employment services are not accessible for Parenting Payment recipients until their youngest child is six years old, ParentsNext is available earlier by supporting eligible families with young children to become job-ready and find work faster. More than 10,000 of these parents are expected to be under the age of 25 years.
  • ParentsNext is a pre-employment program which connects eligible parents of young children to services in their local community to help them plan and prepare for employment by the time their children are at school.